Integrating Science and History for April

I am super late in posting this, since I intended to do so on April 1st. At least it is still the first week of April and I am not too late. Here are five historical events that took place during the month of April, the science of each event, and 5-7 ways that homeschoolers can incorporate learning about each of these events into their lessons.

Integrating Science and History for April

The Invention of the Dollar Sign

The Science of This Event

In April 1778, merchant and financier Oliver Pollock invented the American dollar sign $. This event is more math than science, but it’s okay to lump it together into STEM. The dollar sign $ is a shortened form of the Spanish word pesos. Written quickly, Ps can become $.

What Homeschoolers Can Do

Books You May Love


Matthew Henson, Robert Peary, and the North Pole

The Science of This Event

In April 1909, navigator and craftsman Matthew Henson and US Navy engineer  Robert Peary became the first explorers to reach the North Pole. The North Pole is the northern point of our planet’s axis, located in the Arctic Ocean. Because sea ice is continuously shifting, it is difficult to pinpoint an exact location on land.

What Homeschoolers Can Do

Books You May Love


The Olympics

The Science of This Event

In April 1896, the first modern Olympic games opened in Athens, Greece. Health, fitness and nutrition is crucial for athletes, so these Olympians and their coaches need to understand the science behind what keeps the body running for peak performance.

What Homeschoolers Can Do

Books You May Love


The Titanic

The Science of This Event

In April 1912, the “unsinkable” Titanic departed England for its maiden voyage. The massive ship was punctured by an ice berg after 3 days at sea and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean  2 hours and 40 minutes later.

What Homeschoolers Can Do

Books You May Love


Highest Wind Ever Recorded

The Science of This Event

In April 1934, the Mount Washington Observatory in New Hampshire recorded the highest surface wind ever measured and it was a whopping 231 miles per hour. The 6288 foot tall mountain is the highest peak in the northeastern United States. In honor is this event, April 12 is deemed Big Wind Day.

What Homeschoolers Can Do

Books You May Love

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